Support quality local journalism. Become a subscriber.

Didn't get a chance to finish your story? Purchase a day pass digital subscription and you'll receive unlimited online access for one day (24 hours). You will have immediate access upon completion of your purchase.

Mask graphic

Americans are increasingly adopting the use of cloth face masks to slow the spread of COVID-19, and the latest science may convince even more to do so.

In an editorial published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reviewed the latest science and affirms that cloth face coverings are a critical tool in the fight against COVID-19 that could reduce the spread of the disease, particularly when used universally within communities. There is increasing evidence that cloth face coverings help prevent people who have COVID-19 from spreading the virus to others.

“We are not defenseless against COVID-19,” said CDC Director Dr. Robert R. Redfield. “Cloth face coverings are one of the most powerful weapons we have to slow and stop the spread of the virus – particularly when used universally within a community setting. All Americans have a responsibility to protect themselves, their families, and their communities.”

This review included two case studies recently published, one from JAMA, showing that adherence to universal masking policies reduced SARS-CoV-2 transmission within a Boston hospital system, and one from CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), showing that wearing a mask prevented the spread of infection from two hairstylists to their customers in Missouri.

Additional data in MMWR showed that immediately after the White House Coronavirus Task Force and CDC advised Americans to wear cloth face coverings when leaving home, the proportion of U.S. adults who chose to do so increased, with 3 in 4 reporting they had adopted the recommendation in a national Internet survey.

The results of the Missouri case study provide further evidence on the benefits of wearing a cloth face covering. The investigation focused on two hairstylists — infected with and having symptoms of COVID-19 — whose salon policy followed a local ordinance requiring cloth face coverings for all employees and patrons. The investigators found that none of the stylists’ 139 clients or secondary contacts became ill, and all 67 clients who volunteered to be tested showed no sign of infection.

The finding adds to a growing body of evidence that cloth face coverings provide source control – that is, they help prevent the person wearing the mask from spreading COVID-19 to others. The main protection individuals gain from masking occurs when others in their communities also wear face coverings.

Acceptance of Face Mask Guidance Increased

CDC analyzed data from an Internet survey of a national sample of 503 adults during April 7–9 and found that about 62 percent said they would follow the newly announced recommendations to wear a face mask when outside the home. A repeat survey during May 11-13 showed that the percentage of adults endorsing face mask wearing increased to more than 76 percent.

The increase was driven largely by a significant jump in approval by white, non-Hispanic adults, from 54 percent to 75 percent. Approval among Black, non-Hispanic adults went up from 74 percent to 82 percent, and remained stable among Hispanic/Latino adults at 76 percent and 77 percent.

There was also a large increase in face-mask approval among respondents in the Midwest, from 44 percent to 74 percent. Approval was greatest in the Northeast, going from 77 percent to 87 percent.

For more information visit www.cdc.gov and follow the coronavirus information.