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Vinton man sentenced to nearly 7 years for distributing meth

David McVay

CEDAR RAPIDS — A Vinton man, who sold methamphetamine to confidential informants and others numerous times and also manufactured the drug, was sentenced Wednesday to almost seven years in federal prison.

David McVay, 41, was convicted in July of distributing methamphetamine in March 2017.

Court documents show law enforcement started receiving “consistent information” in 2016 about McVay distributing and manufacturing meth and sometimes exchanging stolen property for drugs.

Based on their investigation, officers believed McVay was the “No. 2 person” for distributing meth in Vinton during 2016 and 2017.

McVay sold meth to a confidential informant on four separate occasions in 2017, and the purity of the drug from three buys was over 95 percent, according to court documents.

In June 2017, McVay was found with another person making meth.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Ashley Corkery said McVay had a lengthy criminal history, with nine convictions for distribution of drugs. Other convictions included theft, domestic violence, interference with official acts and several drunken driving-related offenses.

Corkery said McVay, who has a serious drug addiction and has failed drug treatment in the past, possessed large quantities of meth. He sold up to an ounce to the confidential informant and at one time was making $4,000 from sales, while exchanging stolen items and pseudoephedrine to make more meth.

McVay, during the hearing, said he was “glad for the chance to get help” for his drug problem.

U.S. District Judge C.J. Williams didn’t vary downward in the sentencing guideline, as the defense requested, but sentenced McVay at the bottom of the guideline to 83 months in prison, saying he wasn’t like some dealers who are making large profits off others’ addiction.

McVay, he said, was more of a “small time peddler” to support himself and his addiction.

McVay also was ordered to serve four years of supervised release after prison.